Members

IEA Wind TCP Contracting Parties

Austria
Ministry for Climate Action, Environment, Energy, Mobility, Innovation and Technology (BMK)
Belgium
Government of Belgium
Canada
Natural Resources Canada (NRCan)
CWEA (Sponsor)
Chinese Wind Energy Association
Denmark
Danish Energy Agency (DEA)
European Commission
European Commission (EC)
Finland
Business Finland
France
Government of France
Germany
Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi)
Greece
Center of Renewable Energy Sources (CRES)
1) National Institute of Wind Energy (NIWE)
2) Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE)
3) Government of India
Ireland
Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland (SEAI)
1) Ricerca sul Sistema Energetico (RSE S.p.A.)
2) Italian National Agency for New Technology, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development (ENEA)
Japan
New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO)
Mexico
Instituto Nacional de Electricidad y Energías Limpias (INEEL)
Netherlands
Ministry of Economic Affairs
Norway
1) The Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Directorate (NVE)
2) Research Council of Norway (RCN)
Portugal
National Laboratory of Energy and Geology (LNEG)
Government of Korea
Centro de Investigaciónes Energetícas Medioambientales y Tecnológicas (CIEMAT)
Sweden
Swedish Energy Agency (SEA)
Switzerland
Swiss Federal Office of Energy  (SFOE)
United Kingdom
Offshore Renewable Energy Catapult (ORE Catapult)
United States
The U.S. Department of Energy  (DOE)

Member Countries

The IEA Wind TCP is an international co-operation of 23 countries and sponsor members that share information and research activities to advance wind energy deployment. Costa Rica and Colombia are about to join, and Poland has been invited.

IEA Wind TCP member governments establish national targets for renewable energy and wind energy, design market mechanisms and energy policies, and fund research and development (R&D) programs to help reach these targets.

As of 2020, about 85% of the world’s wind generating capacity–and nearly all offshore capacity–resides within the participating countries. To learn more about the work of each participating member, please click on any of the countries or sponsors below.

About Participating

The IEA Wind TCP seeks to develop and deploy wind energy technology through vigorous national programs and the co-operative international efforts of its member countries and sponsors.

Participants currently include 23 member countries from Europe, North America, and Asia, as well as the Chinese Wind Energy Association, the European Commission, and WindEurope (formerly the European Wind Energy Association).

The IEA Wind TCP is always looking for new members across the globe, and potential new member countries are encouraged to attend meetings and begin the process of joining. For more information on joining the IEA Wind TCP, click here.

Membership

IEA Wind Membership

The IEA Wind TCP is a membership-based organization. The TCP accommodates collaboration among different entities, such as government institutions, universities, utilities, and private companies.

Together, these member countries and sponsors multiply the work of national efforts with information exchange and joint research and development projects. These activities stimulate co-operation on wind energy research and development and provide high quality information and analysis to member governments and commercial sector leaders. Co-operative research and information sharing also accelerate the pace of technology development, promote standardization (through Recommended Practices), and saves time and money in national research programs.

Benefits of Participation

IEA Wind membership multiplies the work of national efforts with information exchange and joint research and development projects.

The Strategic Plan goal is “…to stimulate co-operation on wind energy research and development and to provide high-quality information and analysis to member governments and commercial sector leaders by addressing technology development and deployment and its benefits, markets, and policy instruments.”

Cooperative research and information sharing also accelerate the pace of technology development, promote standardization through recommended practices, and save time and money in national research programs. The following two documents provide more detail about current activities and accomplishments.

How To Join

Membership is open to any country or institution with an active wind energy program, and prospective members are encouraged to join by following these procedures:

  • Have a representative from your country to attend an Executive Committee (ExCo) meeting and present an overview of wind energy research, development, and deployment activities in your country. This gives your organization first-hand information about the information sharing and cooperative research opportunities offered by joining IEA Wind.
  • Following your presentation, the IEA Wind ExCo will vote to invite your country to participate. This vote can take place at the meeting or be conducted by email ballot between meetings.
  • Once the ExCo has officially invited your country to join, your government needs to send a letter to the Executive Director of the IEA, indicating that it accepts the invitation. This letter also designates an organization to be the contracting party to the agreement. There are 2 options here:

Option A

The government decides to participate as a contracting party in its own name and on its own behalf. In this case, the government’s letter to the Executive Director of the IEA should stipulate:

  1. That the Government wishes to join the Implementing Agreement and accepts all terms and conditions of its participation as a Contracting Party, (attend meetings, participate in at least one annex, and pay fees to the Common Fund.)
  2. The Research Tasks in which it will participate
  3. The person who will sign the Implementing Agreement (with full contact details)
  4. Who will be the ExCo Member and the ExCo Alternate Member (with full contact details)

Option B

The government wishes to designate another entity to participate in the Agreement as a contracting party, and such entity is not a government body (i.e., a company, a university, or a private research institute). In this case, the government will need to send a letter to the Executive Director of the IEA informing him that it has designated such an entity as a contracting party for and on behalf of the government. The designated entity will also need to send an official letter to the Executive Director of the IEA, indicating:

  1. That it was designated by the Government to join the Agreement
  2. The Research Tasks in which it will participate
  3. The person who will sign the IA (with full contact details)
  4. The ExCo Member and the ExCo Alternate Member (with full contact details)

A form letter for this correspondence is provided by the IEA Secretariat with your invitation.

  • Once the letter(s) are received by the IEA, they will arrange for the signature of the Agreement by sending a “signature page” together with a copy of the latest version of the Implementing Agreement text to the official signatory authority, who will be requested to sign it and return it to the IEA.

These instructions are also available for download here. Throughout this process, the IEA Wind Secretariat and the legal staff at IEA will work to make this process as smooth and speedy as possible.

If you have any questions, please contact the Secretariat.